Before I Fall ~ Lauren Oliver : Book Review // Excitement for movie (released on March 3, 17)

Summary: 

For popular high school senior Samantha Kingston, February 12—”Cupid Day”—should be one big party, a day of valentines and roses and the privileges that come with being at the top of the social pyramid. And it is…until she dies in a terrible accident that night.

However, she still wakes up the next morning. In fact, Sam lives the last day of her life seven times, until she realizes that by making even the slightest changes, she may hold more power than she ever imagined.

Review:

Rating: 4 stars

Things I liked:

• The ending. Although the whole story reminded me of other books, the ending was unique and I love the moral.

• Character development. In retrospect, the whole point of the story was character development, and it was beautifully carried out.

• Kent. I was wayyyy more obsessed with this character than I was supposed to be. He was so unique, and so unlike other characters in YA novels.

• The literary references. Like how Sam uses her English class knowledge (page 44, last two lines, for those who have read the book). Also the Biblical allusions, which I missed in the beginning, but it all suddenly clicked near the ending.

• The writing style. It’s very poetic, and I love the basis on which the book has been divided.

Things I didn’t like: 

• It was kind of repetitive. I know that was necessary for the plot, but still.

• I wish this book wasn’t created along the lines of so many other YA novels. So many parts reminded me of If I Stay and Paper Towns. It was like John Green, David Levithan, Jandy Nelson and Jennifer Niven had a conference and cooked up the idea.

Overall

I am very excited to watch the movie. It looks much better than I imagined. Here’s the trailer if you still haven’t watched it:

https://youtu.be/f5hIJsdIQCc
This book is worth reading if you want a YA novel with a twist and a moral.

~ Sreepurna

💚

Worldwide (Boy Band#3) ~ Jacqueline E. Smith : Book Review

Summary:

Melissa Parker’s secret is out. 

Now that the entire world knows she’s dating Sam Morneau, Mel suddenly finds herself and her relationship under the intense scrutiny of celebrity gossip bloggers, curious fans, and appropriately concerned family members. 

But then, that’s nothing compared to the other secrets and scandals that plague The Kind of September. In the midst of their long-anticipated world tour, a toxic combination of infidelity and betrayal has left the band and its fan base angry, confused, and ultimately broken. 

No one ever said that life with the world’s most popular boy band was easy, but in spite of everything she’s seen, Mel is still willing to believe that it’s worth it.

REVIEW:

Rating : 4 stars out of 5

This book was possibly my favorite one in the series yet? The story has become SO much more interesting at this point, I NEED to know the rest of it ASAP.

I have always loved the Boy Band characters. Sam is hilarious, Mel is quite funny herself in that awkward way of hers. I love all the boys (even Jesse), but right now let’s just say there is one boy in the band, I am unhappy with *cough* Mr. Bad Choices *cough*

Worldwide provides an even more detailed picture of the negative sides of fame. Even though Sam and Mel try their best to handle things as smoothly as possible, they face a lot of hardships, and this was portrayed VERY realistically, through fan tweets and newspaper article snippets.

Jacqueline E. Smith’s easy going style of writing is something I admire in all of her books. The story always progresses fast and efficiently. I finished this book in one single sitting and loved every second of it. I say this all the time, and will repeat it again- I love how each Boy Band novel ends with us readers NEEDING the next book NOW. It increases my respect for the book every time.

My favorite part of the book though was the chapter intro style. All the Boy Band novel chapters begin with a couple of lines from a song by the fictional band in the series, or by the other musicians mentioned in the book. I love the idea, but Worldwide had the best lyrics out of all the boy band novels. 💕

So if you love music and/or boy bands, cute romances, stories about friendship and love and drama and celebrities — go pick up these books now!

~ Sreepurna.

💚

Lyrebird – Cecelia Ahern : Book Review

413 pages

Published: November 3, 2016

ISBN13: 9780007501861

Summary: 



Life is in two parts: who you were before you met her, and who you are after.

A documentary crew discover a mysterious young women living alone in the mountains of West Cork. Strikingly beautiful she has an extraordinary talent for mimicry, like the famous Australian Lyrebird. The crew, fascinated, make her the subject of her story, and bestow the nickname upon her.

When they leave, they take Lyrebird with them back to the city. But as she leaves behind her peaceful life to learn about a new world, is she also leaving behind a part of herself? For her new friend Solomon the answer isn’t clear. When you find a rare and precious thing, should you share it – or protect it…

Review:

Rating : ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 stars

At this point I have blind faith on Cecelia Ahern. I went into this book knowing that it’d be good, and I obviously wasn’t disappointed.

Ahern’s writing has always had a very lyrical quality to it, and somehow the atmosphere and characters in Lyrebird just enhance this, and give the story a whole lot of added magic.

The concept, as usual, was really unique. Laura, the beautiful mysterious woman Solomon and Bo discover living alone in a mountainous locality, is the lyrebird. She literally can mimic any sound she hears, and tends to do so more when she is upset or anxious. This magical girl is brought to our noisy world and the story shows her transfer from the solitary life in the wilderness to the hustling and bustling city, while she discovers more about life and people.

I loved Laura, and I could relate to Bo, somewhat. I sometimes found Solomon a little weak, though. But somehow these just made them all so real.

Overall, I would definitely recommend this book. The thing about Cecelia Ahern is that her books don’t fit into any particular genre, and I feel like most people should give her books a try.

If you still aren’t sold, take a look at the cover of the book. And judge it by this cover.

~ Sripurna.

Tiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra & Dhonielle Clayton ~ Book Review // a.k.a the book I severely underestimated.


Summary: 

Gigi, Bette, and June, three top students at an exclusive Manhattan ballet school, have seen their fair share of drama. Free-spirited new girl Gigi just wants to dance—but the very act might kill her. Privileged New Yorker Bette’s desire to escape the shadow of her ballet star sister brings out a dangerous edge in her. And perfectionist June needs to land a lead role this year or her controlling mother will put an end to her dancing dreams forever. When every dancer is both friend and foe, the girls will sacrifice, manipulate, and backstab to be the best of the best.

Review :

Rating: 4.5 stars

I underestimated this book so much.

Out of the three books I received from HarperCollins for review last week, this was the one I was least interested in. Which is why I picked it up first (you know, saving the best for the last and all). I went into it quite blindly, having just skimmed through the back cover summary. All I knew was that it was about a ballet school, and no joke, I just expected lots of YA drama about white girls dressed in tutus (which would be great, but a little cliched).

I was blown away with the diversity in this book, in terms of race and sexual orientation. What I loved more though was that no specific race was specifically victimized and the girls were defined as separate human beings, instead of being cliche portrayals based on skin colour.

I know practically nothing about ballet. But that didn’t really prove to be much of a problem, because the story mainly dealt with the personal lives of the teens, not the technical ballet side of it. The cutthroat competition, desperate moves, it was all so well described, I didn’t need to be a ballet expert to appreciate Tiny Pretty Things.

The characters of this book are really complex and well-formed. I initially loved Gigi the most, but later on I felt like she is the one with the least amount of dimensions. Bette and June have much deeper tones to them, and throughout the course of the story, I started having a neutral opinion about the characters.

I recommend this book to anyone who wants a heavier and more thought provoking young adult novel. The name of the book is terribly misleading, and I am finding it hard to classify into a genre, but this is one eye-opening book that is worth a read.

Somebody please get me the second book in this duology.

~ Sreepurna. 💜

No Plain Rebel- M.C. Frank: Review //Goes straight to my Top 5 reads of 2016


No Plain Rebel (No Ordinary Star #2)

M.C. Frank

Summary:

A soldier is summoned to the North Pole, days before the year changes, told to fix a the great Clock for a celebration. He has no idea what to do. 

A girl, hunted for the crime of being born, almost dies out on the ice. She is rescued by the last polar bear left alive. 

A library waits for them both, a library built over a span of a hundred years, forgotten in the basement of an ice shack. 

The world hasn’t known hunger or sickness in hundreds of years. It has also forgotten love and beauty. 

The year is 2525. 


Inspired by the short stories of Ray Bradbury, this futuristic novel is set in a world where Christmas -among other things- is obsolete and a Clock is what keeps the fragile balance of peace. 

Written in three installments, this is the breathtaking and sensual story of how two unlikely people change the world, and each other, one book at a time. 

Immerse yourself into the icy cold world of this scorching hot new novel. 

In No Plain Rebel, Felix finds out the truth. 

Or so he thinks. He’s trying to come to terms with that, as well as with the fact that the Clockmaster’s shack has been discovered by his fellow-soldiers, but he can’t exactly concentrate. The match girl’s fiery curls appear before his eyes every ten seconds, distracting him, and then he starts talking to her in his head. 

Because she’s no longer there. 

The Stadium is looming in the distance. 

It’s ten heartbeats to midnight.


Review:
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5

This book is magic.

“I hate you back, he tries to say, only his lungs can’t draw in enough air.” 

Things I liked about this book:

Everything. I repeat, EVERYTHING.

Writing reviews is sometimes really frustrating. I just can’t explain how sincere I am about my feelings for this book. It’s so easy not to trust a review. And so difficult to make people believe I mean every word from the bottom of my heart.

M.C. Frank is amazingly talented. I have read her book Ruined before this (https://thelonelybooklover.wordpress.com/2016/09/09/ruined-by-m-c-frank-review-spoiler-free/), it’s a historical romance which I LOVED. I can’t believe the same person can write a dystopian fiction with such ease and make it COMPLETELY different and unique. As I mentioned in my review of book 1 of this series (https://thelonelybooklover.wordpress.com/2016/11/28/no-ordinary-star-part-1-m-c-frank-book-review-this-will-be-short-because-i-need-to-read-the-next-part-now/), I am in awe.

When M.C. Frank describes the freezing cold breeze of the North Pole, you literally shiver. No joke. When she writes of Astra describing Felix holding her, I kid you not, it felt like someone lit a warm cosy fire near my soul.

I stayed up till 2.00 a.m. last night, reading No Plain Rebel and came to the conclusion that it is one of my favorite dystopian novels. I have read many books of this genre, in fact I started finding them quite boring and similar. But ohmygod this series is so good I can literally cry.

I am so emotionally vested in Astra and Felix’s lives, that my heart is in the author’s hands now. I don’t have any idea what can happen in the third book of the series but I am waiting with bated breath to find out.

Things I didn’t like about the book: 

This probably makes me a bad reviewer, but I couldn’t find a single flaw in this book.If you don’t believe me, read the book and show me ONE flaw.

Also:

This is not a sad book per se. And I don’t usually cry after reading books (I did not cry after TFIOS or Nicholas Sparks books). Then why did I tear up while reading No Plain Rebel?

I guess you never know WHAT could be a trigger for someone. You could find something cute, while I could cry buckets over the same story.

Also (this is the last one):

Please read this book. I am not asking as a reviewer. I am asking as a fellow book lover. If you want to read a solid good book which teaches you things and yet want to enjoy it, read this book.

Amazon purchase links: 

No Ordinary Star (Part 1):  https://www.amazon.com/No-Ordinary-Star-M-C-Frank/dp/1518681093

No Plain Rebel (Part 2): https://www.amazon.com/No-Plain-Rebel-Ordinary-Star/dp/1519171994

~Sripurna ❤

No Ordinary Star (Part 1) – M.C. Frank : Book Review // This will be short because I NEED TO READ THE NEXT PART NOW

Summary :

A soldier is summoned to the North Pole, days before the year changes, told to fix the great Clock for a celebration. He has no idea what to do. 

A girl, hunted for the crime of being born, almost dies out on the ice. She is rescued by the last polar bear left alive. 

A library waits for them both, a library built over a span of a hundred years, forgotten in the basement of an ice shack. 

The world hasn’t known hunger or sickness in hundreds of years. It has also forgotten love and beauty. 

The year is 2525. 


Inspired by the short stories of Ray Bradbury, this futuristic novel is set in a world where Christmas -among other things- is obsolete and a Clock is what keeps the fragile balance of peace. 


Written in three installments, this is the breathtaking and sensual story of how two unlikely people change the world, and each other, one book at a time. 


Immerse yourself into the icy cold world of this scorching hot new novel.


Review:

Rating : 5/5 

So I have been staring at my computer screen for the last five minutes, thinking about what to write.

Because I don’t think I am capable of writing a review for this book.

I am in awe.

This book isn’t like anything I have ever read before. I closed my Kindle app, and I am looking around and surprisingly THIS world seems surreal now. This tiny book that took me two really short sittings to finish captivated me so much that the STORY seems more real than reality.

Do I even make sense right now?

I COULD write about the storyline right now. But you already have Goodreads and Amazon for that. Or I could write a detailed literary essay, except I haven’t read anything by Bradbury, whose writings inspired this story, so I don’t think I am qualified enough to do that.

All I can say is HOLY HELL THIS BOOK NEEDS MORE HYPE. Because No Ordinary Star has EVERYTHING. It is deep, it is amazingly unique, it has suspense. The world building is perfect, there is no introduction to the world, you just have to keep reading the book to figure things out.The characters are so foreign and yet so natural.

I am fangirling too much right now to write anything more coherent. I hope I could express the effect No Ordinary Star had on me.

Go. Read. It. Whatever your usual genre is. It doesn’t matter.

~Sripurna ❤

The Liberty Box (#1) & The Eden Conspiracy (#2) : Review

ARCs received in exchange of an honest review.

PART 1

The Liberty Box

C.A. Gray 

Kate Brandeis has it all: a famous reporter at the age of twenty-four, she’s the face of the Republic of the Americas. She has a loving fiancé and all the success she could wish for. But when she learns of the death of a long-forgotten friend, her investigations unravel her perfect memories, forcing her to face the fact that she’s been living a lie. 

Jackson MacNamera, trained from a young age in the art of mind control, returns to the Republic for his mother’s funeral. Within a few hours of his arrival, authorities collect Jackson and take him by force to a room ironically called The Liberty Box, where he must choose between surrendering his thoughts to the new Republic, or fleeing for his freedom. 



Kate, bereaved and confused, finds her way to a cave community of refugees, where Jackson seems to offer her an escape from her grief. The two forge an uneasy bond, and in the process Jackson learns that Kate has some insight which may help the hunters in their attempt to free other citizens from the tyranny of the Potentate. Against the expressed wishes of the Council, the hunters plot a series of daring raids, attempting to prove that not only is freedom possible, but that the citizens are not too far gone to desire it. But with the odds so stacked against them, can the refugees succeed in their rescue missions right under the Potentate’s nose?



Rating: 3/5

REVIEW:

The Liberty Box is an unusual book. This dystopian novel is not your Hunger Games or Divergent. The characters here are older (which makes more sense, I mean c’mon, teenagers saving the world? It was becoming quite boring), and you can defintely classify this into the sci-fi genre.

The book begins with a slightly boring prologue, but it picks up pace when the main story begins. Kate isn’t the best protagonist, but she is unique in her own way. At around 19% into the book, Jackson appears, making things much more interesting.

The book ends with a pretty intelligent cliffhanger. Amidst all the action I didn’t expect the twist, but that’s what made me read the next book.

Overall; this a a good enough start to an adult dystopian trilogy. It has action, romance, science, drama, and truthfully, it was quite enjoyable.

PART 2 

The Eden Conspiracy (The Liberty Box #2)

C.A. Gray

Can the truth set you free?

The refugee caves have been destroyed, and most of the refugees are dead. The Potentate now knows of their existence and will stop at nothing to wipe them out completely. He suspects that terrorist Jackson MacNamera is among them, as well as reporter Kate Brandeis’s fiancé, hacker Will Anderson—and probably therefore Kate herself. Now that the Potentate is aware of security threats, most of the strategies the rebels used to get back onto the grid before now no longer work. The Potentate knows the rebels are on foot, and he knows they were at the caves not long ago—they can’t get far.



The remaining rebels, among them Jackson and Kate, have Kate’s fiancé Will to thank for their survival: he arrived back from the dead and in the nick of time, bearing classified information about the Potentate’s plans to expand his influence internationally. But the remaining rebels and the Council cannot agree on whether their top priority should be spreading truth far and wide and freeing as many citizens from government control as possible, knowing that they will likely die in the process—or escaping to New Estonia, in hopes that they might live out the rest of their days in peace.



Kate, meanwhile, finds herself torn: between Jackson and the fiancé she thought she lost, and between the damsel-in-distress she once was, and the rebel she believes she has always been underneath. Whether the other hunters will support her or no, she knows she must use her influence over the people of the Republic to tell them the truth, no matter the cost. But is she strong enough to withstand the government’s lies?



Rating: 3.5/ 5

This book was surprisingly good. I normally find things to become a little boring at the second book of a trilogy, but The Eden Conspiracy was definitely anything but boring.

The twist at the ending of the first book made the second book so much better. Even though these books are from the third person POV, you have alternate chapters from two different perspectives: Jackson’s and Kate’s, making things even better.

The ending of this book too is great, and I can’t wait to read the third book.

To purchase The Liberty Box visit this link.

~Sripurna