“Tanya Tania” by Antara Ganguli : Review 

Tanya Tania

Antara Ganguli


Summary:
“Last night there was a snowstorm that made my window disappear. I woke up gasping at the heater. This is my first letter in three years. First letter since I left Pakistan. First letter since Nusrat. “

Tanya Tania is a story about two young women coming of age in two countries that are coming of age. Tanya Talati in Karachi and Tania Ghosh in Bombay, daughters of college best friends, write to each other of what cannot be said to anyone else: a mother who has gone from quiet to silent, sex that has become a weapon, a servant with unforgettably soft hands and a country beginning to play with religion. When Tanya’s brother receives a kidnapping threat, she sets in motion what no one could have predicted, least of all Tania, who finds herself alone in a forbidden bazaar in Bombay, listening to the sounds of a riot torn city coming closer and closer and closer . . .



Written in letters that span six years, Tanya Tania is a story of what it means to be between childhood and adulthood at a time when two countries are struggling with what it means to be Indian and Pakistani, rich and poor, confident and lonely. A story of love between girls, between families and between countries, Tanya Tania, is, at its heart, a love story about what it means to be human.



Review:

4/5 stars ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Thank you Bloomsbury India for sending me a review copy of this book.

Things I liked about this book:

• For the past few years, I have read almost nothing by any Indian author. I have always had a prejudice against them (you can’t blame me, because the prime examples of Indian authors seem to be Chetan Bhagat and Durjoy Dutta, and I have tried readingtheir books. Enough said) . But recently I came across a few other books which totally changed my perspective. Antara Ganguli’s Tanya Tania is one such example.

 Tanya Talati and Tania Ghosh, both were extremely well-constructed and realistic characters.

The concept of a book through letters is something I loved. The only other time I have come across this concept was Cecelia Ahern’s Love Rosie, I had loved it then, I love it now.

Tanya Tania also taught me some parts of the history of our country, about the last decade of the 20th century.

Things I didn’t like about this book:

The ending was sort of anticlimactic. It just wasn’t enough, because the whole book was built towards the ending, but it just fell flat there.

I couldn’t relate to either Tanya or Tania. They were supposed to be normal teenagers I am guessing? But I couldn’t relate.

Overall:

Even though the story falls slightly flat, the writing style and the small and big lessons you learn from this book cannot be ignored. If you ask me whether you should read it, I’d say yes, definitely.

~Sripurna.

Ruined by M.C.Frank : Review {Spoiler Free}

Ruined

M.C. Frank

The duke of Ashton sits at the Opera at Vauxhall Gardens, bored out of his mind, and plans murder.

He curses the day that brought the little governess, destitute and sad, at his door eight months ago, to upset his careless if a bit meaningless existence. 

How could he have guessed the terrible, evil secrets she was hiding? And now that he knows all, the truth appears wilder, even more despicable than even he could have imagined. He hadn’t counted on losing his heart to her, of course, but he did.

What he doesn’t know is that a tendril of the shadows of madness and sin that followed Beatrice to his door is still out there, looking for something to devour.

The only one who can save him from the darkness is the girl herself, but he knows he’ll never see her again. He who once prided himself on his indifference to other human beings, feels his chest constrict with pain every time he even thinks of her. 

Beatrice, smart, gentle, kind-hearted, lovely.
Ruined. 

A perfect blend of darkness and light, this reverse Regency retelling of Jane Eyre will break your heart as well as uplift it.



REVIEW:

4.5 stars

I want to make something clear, no way am I a biased reviewer here. Whatever I am about to say regarding this book is entirely true.

Moving on.

Ruined is definitely one of my favorite reads this year. This book has EVERYTHING I love:

~An old-fashioned historical romance

~ A retelling (A reverse Regency retelling of Jane Eyre)

~A crazy alpha hero

~ A strong female protagonist

~ Lots of banter

M. C . Frank’s writing style is simply beautiful. Every line is interesting, and I didn’t feel like setting the book down at all. Dominic and Beatrice are the perfect protagonists, the character development is steady, the mystery element is also necessary and engrossing.

There are scenes in this book that are so full of raw emotions, I honestly choked and teared up a little with the feels. Ever since I finished reading the book, I have been re-reading some of those scenes, and I just can’t get enough.

The incidents in this book are vividly described, but the book is fast-paced and the writing style is really smooth. There WERE a few technical problems with some information, but find me romance novel with no mistake.

No spoilers in this review, so I won’t say much else.

But a fair warning, this is a very loose retelling of Jane Eyre. You can’t expect the original. If you just want to read an easier version Jane Eyre, you can go to Cliffnotes or something, no?

And now the reason why it took me so long to write and post this review. Ever since I finished Ruined, I have been re-obsessed (huh? I just invented that) with historical romance novels! I spent this whole week reading as many as I could lay my hands upon! And so I have been delaying the writing of this review for a long time now!

In other words, you should totally read Ruined. Its worth every dime and every second you spend on it.

To buy a copy of Ruined, Click here.

P.S.: Writing this review made me remember the feeeeeels all over again ❤

~ Sripurna

Rau (The Great Love Story Of Bajirao Mastani): Review 

RAU

N.S. INAMDAR

The novel that inspired the award-winning film 


‘My eyes, they rain all the time 
My eyes, they rain all the time 
Till I see him in mine’ 

When Shrimant Bajirao Peshwa, feared by even the mighty Mughals, hears the exquisite Mastani sing, the passion that sparks between them grows quickly into a raging fire. 

The Peshwa defies his orthodox Brahmin heritage, declaring his love openly for the half-Muslim dancer, in the face of fierce opposition. A man way ahead of his time, Bajirao causes outrage when he marries Mastani, bringing her into his home as his second wife. 

N. S. Inamdar’s timeless tale, that has inspired both film and television, brings alive the romance, intrigue and valour of the eighteenth-century Maratha empire. This irresistible novel is one of India’s favourite love stories.



RATING: 3 stars

REVIEW:

I am left with mixed feelings about this book.

Firstly, I’d like to say, anyone who liked the movie Bajirao Mastani should read this book. It’s a more enriched version of the movie (albeit, without Deepika or Ranveer, so you’ll miss them probably 😂😂). But if you liked the movie, there’s a high chance you’ll love the book.

It has action, romance and lots of drama.

But.

There were things I really didn’t like.

No. 1, the writing. Somehow, the writing or perhaps the translation (because the original is in Marathi) fell flat. The words were mechanical, and somewhat forced. Also; this book needs a glossary in the end, to explain the meanings of some Marathi words, which weren’t possible to translate. Being an Indian, I know bits and pieces of Hindi, and that’s the only reason I could still guess the meanings of some words. But I think a glossary would be great.

I hated the characters of this book. Literally loathed them. They are all historical characters, I don’t know how much of the story is authentic, but according to this book, the characters sucked. Big time. I found nothing romantic and tragic about Rau and Mastani’s “love”. Its all shown as something very very superficial.

But the fact remains that this book made me feel a lot of things — anger, hatred, sorrow and sympathy (towards Kashibai, actually). And that’s why I think this book is worty of reading. Because rarely does a book make you ponder so long these days.

To buy the book on Amazon, click here.

~ Sripurna

ও গানওলা lyrics

Those who belong to my native land, this one’s shared for you… I’ve never felt closer to a song, and I’m sure ALL of you can relate to it:

O Gaanola- Suman Chatterjee

ও গানওলা,
অরেকটা গান গাও
আমার আর কোথাও যাবার নেই, কিচ্ছু করার নেই .

ছেলেবেলার সেই বেহালা বাজানাে লােক টা
চলে গেছে বেহালা নিয়ে, চলে গেছে গান শুনিয়ে.
এই পালটানাে সম​য়ে সে ফিরবে কি ফিরবে না জানা নেই..

ও গানওলা,
অরেকটা গান গাও
আমার আর কোথাও যাবার নেই, কিচ্ছু করার নেই .

কৈশাের শেষ হওয়া রঙচঙে স্ব্প্নের দিন ,
চলে যাবে রঙ হারিয়ে, চলে যাবে মুখ ফিরিয়ে.
এই ফিটকাবাজির দেশে স্ব্প্নের পাখিগুলো বেঁচে নেই..

ও গানওলা,
অরেকটা গান গাও
আমার আর কোথাও যাবার নেই, কিচ্ছু করার নেই .