Rau (The Great Love Story Of Bajirao Mastani): Review 

RAU

N.S. INAMDAR

The novel that inspired the award-winning film 


‘My eyes, they rain all the time 
My eyes, they rain all the time 
Till I see him in mine’ 

When Shrimant Bajirao Peshwa, feared by even the mighty Mughals, hears the exquisite Mastani sing, the passion that sparks between them grows quickly into a raging fire. 

The Peshwa defies his orthodox Brahmin heritage, declaring his love openly for the half-Muslim dancer, in the face of fierce opposition. A man way ahead of his time, Bajirao causes outrage when he marries Mastani, bringing her into his home as his second wife. 

N. S. Inamdar’s timeless tale, that has inspired both film and television, brings alive the romance, intrigue and valour of the eighteenth-century Maratha empire. This irresistible novel is one of India’s favourite love stories.



RATING: 3 stars

REVIEW:

I am left with mixed feelings about this book.

Firstly, I’d like to say, anyone who liked the movie Bajirao Mastani should read this book. It’s a more enriched version of the movie (albeit, without Deepika or Ranveer, so you’ll miss them probably 😂😂). But if you liked the movie, there’s a high chance you’ll love the book.

It has action, romance and lots of drama.

But.

There were things I really didn’t like.

No. 1, the writing. Somehow, the writing or perhaps the translation (because the original is in Marathi) fell flat. The words were mechanical, and somewhat forced. Also; this book needs a glossary in the end, to explain the meanings of some Marathi words, which weren’t possible to translate. Being an Indian, I know bits and pieces of Hindi, and that’s the only reason I could still guess the meanings of some words. But I think a glossary would be great.

I hated the characters of this book. Literally loathed them. They are all historical characters, I don’t know how much of the story is authentic, but according to this book, the characters sucked. Big time. I found nothing romantic and tragic about Rau and Mastani’s “love”. Its all shown as something very very superficial.

But the fact remains that this book made me feel a lot of things — anger, hatred, sorrow and sympathy (towards Kashibai, actually). And that’s why I think this book is worty of reading. Because rarely does a book make you ponder so long these days.

To buy the book on Amazon, click here.

~ Sripurna

Enchanted

Feet agile. Long steps to the carnival tent. Step up on the magic carpet. Get away.

Strong hands. Callused palms. Shuffling a deck of cards. I can only choose one.

Brown hair. Specks of fairy dust I showered on you.

Full lips. Uttering spells and charms.

Entrapping, mystifying. Strange unknown languages, yet so familiar.

Mismatched eyes. One green, one grey.Carefully watching everyone. Carefully watching me.

But you are a trickster. I am your audience. Sometimes I feel like your show is only for me. Other times, I am just another in a crowd of people captivated by your tricks.

I don’t know what’s real and what’s not.
Because your words are lies. Illusions. For some reason I don’t mind.

With the click of your fingers, you disappear. Evanescence.

Were you even there to begin with?