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Lyrebird – Cecelia Ahern : Book Review

413 pages

Published: November 3, 2016

ISBN13: 9780007501861

Summary: 



Life is in two parts: who you were before you met her, and who you are after.

A documentary crew discover a mysterious young women living alone in the mountains of West Cork. Strikingly beautiful she has an extraordinary talent for mimicry, like the famous Australian Lyrebird. The crew, fascinated, make her the subject of her story, and bestow the nickname upon her.

When they leave, they take Lyrebird with them back to the city. But as she leaves behind her peaceful life to learn about a new world, is she also leaving behind a part of herself? For her new friend Solomon the answer isn’t clear. When you find a rare and precious thing, should you share it – or protect it…

Review:

Rating : ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 stars

At this point I have blind faith on Cecelia Ahern. I went into this book knowing that it’d be good, and I obviously wasn’t disappointed.

Ahern’s writing has always had a very lyrical quality to it, and somehow the atmosphere and characters in Lyrebird just enhance this, and give the story a whole lot of added magic.

The concept, as usual, was really unique. Laura, the beautiful mysterious woman Solomon and Bo discover living alone in a mountainous locality, is the lyrebird. She literally can mimic any sound she hears, and tends to do so more when she is upset or anxious. This magical girl is brought to our noisy world and the story shows her transfer from the solitary life in the wilderness to the hustling and bustling city, while she discovers more about life and people.

I loved Laura, and I could relate to Bo, somewhat. I sometimes found Solomon a little weak, though. But somehow these just made them all so real.

Overall, I would definitely recommend this book. The thing about Cecelia Ahern is that her books don’t fit into any particular genre, and I feel like most people should give her books a try.

If you still aren’t sold, take a look at the cover of the book. And judge it by this cover.

~ Sripurna.

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Carve The Mark : Veronica Roth ~ SPOILER FREE Review // ASDFGHJKL this book ohmygod just so much

Summary :

In a galaxy powered by the current, everyone has a gift.

Cyra is the sister of the brutal tyrant who rules the Shotet people. Cyra’s currentgift gives her pain and power — something her brother exploits, using her to torture his enemies. But Cyra is much more than just a blade in her brother’s hand: she is resilient, quick on her feet, and smarter than he knows.

Akos is the son of a farmer and an oracle from the frozen nation-planet of Thuvhe. Protected by his unusual currentgift, Akos is generous in spirit, and his loyalty to his family is limitless. Once Akos and his brother are captured by enemy Shotet soldiers, Akos is desperate to get this brother out alive — no matter what the cost.

The Akos is thrust into Cyra’s world, and the enmity between their countries and families seems insurmountable. Will they help each other to survive, or will they destroy one another?

Carve the Mark is Veronica Roth’s stunning portrayal of the power of friendship — and love — in a galaxy filled with unexpected gifts.

Review:

Rating: 5 stars

Let me just start with the fact that I wasn’t a Veronica Roth fan after reading Divergent. I loved the series, but not EVERYTHING about it.

BUT THIS BOOK WAS EVERYTHING.

My favorite genre being sheer, unadulterated romance, I didn’t think I’d like a Sci-Fi book right now. But when I saw that beautiful map of a fictional galaxy on the very first page of Carve The Mark, I was sold.

Akos and Cyra stole my heart completely. Both of them had an amazing amount of character development throughout the book, and (maybe because I am fangirling too hard) I can’t find a flaw in them, or rather, can’t find a flaw that I don’t love and accept.

The pace was perfect, the world-building, which was CRUCIAL in this book, was flawlessly done. The visuals, as in Divergent, are very vivid in this book too. The point where I found out the reason for the name of this book; I think my parents thought I was going crazy the way I was jumping and squealing.

Veronica Roth also has a wonderful way of developing side characters without boring the reader. I want to keep this spoiler free, so that’s all I’ll say about this.

And the ending. We won’t talk about it. Somebody give me information about the next book in this series please.

Overall; I think this is a book you should DEFINITELY read if you are into YA. There’s romance, friendship, family bonding, and a whole new galaxy waiting for you.

And now that I have shown my appreciation, please excuse me while I sit in the corner and stare at the wall till the next book comes out.

~ Sreepurna 💙

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Tiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra & Dhonielle Clayton ~ Book Review // a.k.a the book I severely underestimated.


Summary: 

Gigi, Bette, and June, three top students at an exclusive Manhattan ballet school, have seen their fair share of drama. Free-spirited new girl Gigi just wants to dance—but the very act might kill her. Privileged New Yorker Bette’s desire to escape the shadow of her ballet star sister brings out a dangerous edge in her. And perfectionist June needs to land a lead role this year or her controlling mother will put an end to her dancing dreams forever. When every dancer is both friend and foe, the girls will sacrifice, manipulate, and backstab to be the best of the best.

Review :

Rating: 4.5 stars

I underestimated this book so much.

Out of the three books I received from HarperCollins for review last week, this was the one I was least interested in. Which is why I picked it up first (you know, saving the best for the last and all). I went into it quite blindly, having just skimmed through the back cover summary. All I knew was that it was about a ballet school, and no joke, I just expected lots of YA drama about white girls dressed in tutus (which would be great, but a little cliched).

I was blown away with the diversity in this book, in terms of race and sexual orientation. What I loved more though was that no specific race was specifically victimized and the girls were defined as separate human beings, instead of being cliche portrayals based on skin colour.

I know practically nothing about ballet. But that didn’t really prove to be much of a problem, because the story mainly dealt with the personal lives of the teens, not the technical ballet side of it. The cutthroat competition, desperate moves, it was all so well described, I didn’t need to be a ballet expert to appreciate Tiny Pretty Things.

The characters of this book are really complex and well-formed. I initially loved Gigi the most, but later on I felt like she is the one with the least amount of dimensions. Bette and June have much deeper tones to them, and throughout the course of the story, I started having a neutral opinion about the characters.

I recommend this book to anyone who wants a heavier and more thought provoking young adult novel. The name of the book is terribly misleading, and I am finding it hard to classify into a genre, but this is one eye-opening book that is worth a read.

Somebody please get me the second book in this duology.

~ Sreepurna. 💜